Simply rotten!

Scotty1980

Well-Known Member
#2
They should have the option of renting a coffin, rather than burning a $1700 box. Bit of a waste of money.

But yes, a bit naughty!
 

Shootist

Well-Known Member
#4
At least they could have bought a $70 coffin. In the UK, try getting one at almost any price without paying through the nose to undertakers.
 

rodp

Well-Known Member
#5
At least they could have bought a $70 coffin. In the UK, try getting one at almost any price without paying through the nose to undertakers.
There's a firm by us that make them, I'm sure you could just go in and buy one. With regard to swapping them over before burning, I'll ask my mate, who's an undertaker, if it happens in the trade. I'll bet the answer, if they do, is "Some unscrupulous ones do but we never do it":rolleyes: .....:lol:
 

Alantoo

Well-Known Member
#6
They should have the option of renting a coffin, rather than burning a $1700 box. Bit of a waste of money.

But yes, a bit naughty!
Quite agree.

Surprised they burn the coffin at all, why not just do the body? Sensible and less wasteful to hire a coffin and just use it for handling the body to and from the funeral.

We followed dad's wishes and put him in cardboard box...and he was a furniture maker with a timber shed full of oak. He hated burning and wasting good wood.

Most of the "oak" coffins I have seen have been just oak veneer or photo print onto a chipboard base.

Definitely cardboard box for me as well. A jeweller friend's body was buried in a wood with just a winding sheet around. I found it was good to see his actual body shape rather than a shiny box during the funeral ceremony. Made it very "real"!

Alan
 

Odders

Well-Known Member
#7
Woodland burial in a wickerwork coffin for me, as I think it more environmentally friendly, plus I want to be a tree...:D
 

spandit

Well-Known Member
#8
I planted 120 weaving willow last year. Whilst watching a coffin weaver at a local country show, I asked him how many plants you need to provide enough material for a coffin. After a bit of thought he said "40". That's me, the wife and daughter sorted then!
 

Bavarianbrit

Well-Known Member
#9
I knew someone who was the council official involved somewhere in the midlands with cremations and he said the wood was needed to get the heat up to body reduction/disposal levels otherwise they would have to pump in gas from the mains supply. So a paper/cardboard jobby is not as environmentally sound as it seems then.
 

Alantoo

Well-Known Member
#10
I knew someone who was the council official involved somewhere in the midlands with cremations and he said the wood was needed to get the heat up to body reduction/disposal levels otherwise they would have to pump in gas from the mains supply. So a paper/cardboard jobby is not as environmentally sound as it seems then.
That doesn't sound quite right to me...I would have thought the wood of the box would burn at a lower temperature than the gas especially if it was made from chipboard. The box would also prevent the flame/heat from getting to the body until it was largely consumed anyway.

As far as I know we were not asked for a fuel supplement when we cremated dad in his cardboard coffin.

Alan

ps Just looked it up. Max temperature of burning wood 600 deg. C minimum temperature required to cremate body 850 deg. C
 
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#11
Woodland burial in a wickerwork coffin for me, as I think it more environmentally friendly, plus I want to be a tree...:D
That was the choice of both my mother and father , no head stones allowed just a small flat plaque (optional) with just name and date all graves the same but you are a?lowed to plant a tree but it must be a native species.

Lovely situation overlooking the river the ground a sea of colour in early spring covered with wild Hyacinths ( what you call Bluebells in the south) then later covered in Bluebells (what you call Harebells in the south. and lots of foxgloves in the late summer.
Looks far nicer than a conventional graveyard.
 
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Odders

Well-Known Member
#12
That was the choice of both my mother and father , no head stones allowed just a small flat plaque (optional) with just name and date all graves the same but you are a?lowed to plant a tree but it must be a native species.

Lovely situation overlooking the river the ground a sea of hour in early spring covered with wild Hyacinths ( what you call Bluebells in the south) then later covered in Bluebells (what you call Harebells in the south. and lots of foxgloves in the late summer.
Looks far nicer than a conventional graveyard.
Aye. There's a place in the South Lakes (Cumbria) with much the same ethos & that's where I intend to be planted.
 

Harry mac

Well-Known Member
#13
I like the idea of being burried with a walnut in my pocket. My DNA might end up in a gun stock. I know it probably doesn't work that way, but it's a nice thought.
 

Miki

Well-Known Member
#14
I knew someone who was the council official involved somewhere in the midlands with cremations and he said the wood was needed to get the heat up to body reduction/disposal levels otherwise they would have to pump in gas from the mains supply. So a paper/cardboard jobby is not as environmentally sound as it seems then.
Nope. The cremator is @ 850C before the coffin is put in and the temp is maintained (computer controlled) to stay between 800 and 870C for the 80mins it taked to 'cremate'. Typically/mostly cremators run on natural gas, some are LPG. At one stage (without getting to gory) the expelled gas temp is around 1000C with cold air being introduced to the chamber to regulate the temperature, if it falls below 850C then heat is added ... The cremator has two chambers and a thick lining of refactory (fire) bricks, several tons in weight, all @ 850C. Putting a coffin inside doesn't really lower the temp that much (1 big hot mass meets a small cold mass)...

Paper/carboard coffins burn more readily than wood/veneered chipboard, take less energy to and produce less 'ash' than and eject significantly less formaldahyde. Interestingly wood (weaving/green willow) leaves guite a bit of ash behind so you get a larger volume of remains or less of uncle Bill and more coffin .... and any green wood leaves a nasty, acidic/creosote build up/residue in the gas flue abatement system.
 

Monkey Spanker

Well-Known Member
#17
I don't really care what happens to me when I'm dead as I'll not know a thing about it!
I'd quite happily go in the gralloch bin!
However, for the sake of my family, that may seem a bit basic?
Maybe a cremation accompanied by the soundtrack from storm?
https://www.google.co.uk/url?sa=t&r...=Ue3F3isiCvQ&usg=AOvVaw2GqM3l1kzzvxxS-gt_sPIS
Then chuck a few ashes under each high seat where I shoot. That might take a while though!
Do I believe in the afterlife? No!
When you're dead, you're dead!
Goodnight!
MS
 

johngryphon

Well-Known Member
#19
If not roasting a coffin and having to bury it I believe that to save space instead of wasting it on graves as they are is that all we need to do is use a large auger capable of drilling to say 50' depth and then use cylindrical cardboard (green of course) coffins and then drop the coffin in the hole that would have some sort of hatch on it to allow for further members of a family etc.

Due to decomposition and settling every fifty years we could top them all up again lol.
Map out a cemetery like a giant pegboard,space saving is immense.
 

Bavarianbrit

Well-Known Member
#20
Leave me in the woods for the wild boar as I use them for food so why not later they use me the same way. But in Germany that will not be allowed as undertakers are a total cartel making up and getting them passed laws to suit themselves.
 

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