Stalking with a roe sack.

5pointer

Well-Known Member
Hi all,

My birthday wasn’t all that long ago, and my wife surprised me by getting me a roe sack as a present. I’ve often wondered about the potential benefits of using one, and as I now have the kit it would seem a shame not to give it a go.

However, it has pretty wide and reinforced shoulder straps, which would be ideal for comfort when actually carrying a roe or two, but I’ve not quite sussed out how I would manage to shoot whilst wearing it. When I mount the rifle it sits directly on top of the strap, and I can’t get anything close to a normal gunmount whilst wearing it.

I was hoping that those of you who use these regularly might be able to offer some insight as to a way around this. Do I just try and get used to shooting with it on - which I can’t quite imagine doing? Do I try and take it off quickly before a shot? What would your normal approach be?

All and any advice would be appreciated!

Thanks in advance.

5pointer.
 

banus

Well-Known Member
good evening 5pointer,i use a roe sack,i will leave it once i am on the ground,out of sight out of mind<flask cold drink scran etc> and go stalking .if i shot some thing, i hang it up gralloch it out and walk back to the roe sack,sit down have a drink snack etc then put roe sack on my back head to the carcass.load it in the sack and head to chiller/vehicle,if unsuccessful collect it on the way back.
 

VSS

Well-Known Member
I shoot with a rucksack on my back. Not a roe sack, but the same basic idea. However, only when standing, off sticks. If I'm in for a long crawl and / or a prone shot then I drop it off at the start.
 

Chasey

Well-Known Member
I own one but only used it once. Just didn't get on with it for extraction. Its OK for small roe and defo muntjack, but the bigger ones, not so much. A drag slead is my preference for manual extract.
 

243 Stalker

Well-Known Member
5pointer,

I have stalked for a long time now with a roe sack and can remember at first it being very alien taking a shot with it on, but it soon became the norm. I practiced taking shots with the sack on and found that if I pulled the straps tight it was less obtrusive. The other option I tried but didn’t get on with was to have the strap on my shooting shoulder very slack which made it easy to slip off. I was not in favour of taking the roe sack off just before the shot as the less movement the better for obvious reasons. There are no right or wrong ways just the best way for you, so go out take a few practice shots and find what works.

ATB 243 Stalker
 

Tom D

Well-Known Member
Like VSS I carry a rucksack, I too drop it when I begin the final crawl. Or if I’m shooting from further out I rest on it.
 

The Singing Stalker

Well-Known Member
I use a monarch roe sack. It is clipped shut when empty. So doesn't tend to get in the way. On a lot of my ground I know where I'm going and once there drop the bag and wait, if I decide to move I either put it back on or I won't be more than 5 minutes from the bag if I leave it in place. Can't remember if I have shot anything whilst wearing it tbh.
 

McKenzie

Well-Known Member
I realise it's out of your control now but I would choose a roe sack with wide, flat leather straps rather than a heavy padded strap. No problem to shoot standing & on our wilder shoots I use a roe sack as a game bag as I find it a more comfortable way of carrying a few pheasants for a mile or two. The leather strap doesn't seem to interfere with the shotgun fit for me, never mind a rifle & is less then the thickness of a jacket.
 

5pointer

Well-Known Member
Thank you all for the responses.

From all the advice I’ve received it seems that the best course of action is to just continue trying to adjust and practice with it to a point where I’m comfortable shooting with it, and if that fails I will take it with me and then leave it in an area that’s easy enough to get back to after taking a shot.

Thanks again for the guidance.

5pointer.
 

McKenzie

Well-Known Member
Thank you all for the responses.

From all the advice I’ve received it seems that the best course of action is to just continue trying to adjust and practice with it to a point where I’m comfortable shooting with it, and if that fails I will take it with me and then leave it in an area that’s easy enough to get back to after taking a shot.

Thanks again for the guidance.

5pointer.
I don't know what kind you have but if it's a traditional one you can wrap a bungee cord around it to turn it into a long slim pack that sits in the centre of your back & makes it easier to carry the rifle on your shoulder.
 

philip

Well-Known Member
When I use mine I put a elasticated cord 2-3 turns around it to pull into a thin pillow shape, that sits in the middle of the back out the way of your sticks and rifle, one thing to remember is ensure the straps and buckle can’t wear or catch on to your rifle and create a hook up, on mine with the buckles I made up a thin leather sleeve to go over them on a draw string it works brilliantly and 100% no noise, good thing to have - out of the way of your stalking, it offers a seat and a rest bag as well as a sack
 

SDC7x57

Well-Known Member
Used one for many years - it's a simple affair with no metal buckles to sparkle or rattle. The one thing it does have which I find very handy is a wee roll of leather stitched to the top of each shoulder strap which stops your rifle sling sliding off your shoulder. Use it any way you like as per the previous posts!
 

ChrisWill184

Well-Known Member
I use a monarch roe sack and to be honest I don’t really notice it at all when taking a shot. A lot of my shots these days are off sticks so nearly always standing and I don’t bother with the faff and movement of taking it off. I reckon in the heat of the moment you will hardly notice it there.

As a side, I wondered if I really needed one until my brother bought one for me. Used to either drag or use one of those big ikea bags. The roe sack is a great piece of kit if you have any distance to travel to a vehicle and providing you take the head and feet off, I can fit up to 2 average sized roe in mine - that’s bloody heavy though over half a mile!
 

Camelfarm

Active Member
Was given a Yool roe sack which packs down small enough to go in the map pocket of a pair of army OG trousers that I stalk in - during the summer it's far better than a drag sled because of the amount of standing crops I have to get through - carrying is far better than dragging.

I also have a very second hand Harkila roe sack I was given. Its massive and I just cant get on with it. I would have to cache it somewhere on the walk in.

My issue with a big pack on my back is more increase in the size if my silhouette and exaggeration of movements that it might cause.
 

Erik Hamburger

Well-Known Member
The Roe sack is a pain as it makes you so big and bulky, sometimes you just have to take a shot while still wearing it, as removing it first would cause to much movements, which would give you away. You get used to it. Sometimes you stalk into deer and if they haven't spotted you yet is a good idea to slip it off before taking the shot, or maybe stalk in a little closer.
Sometimes I leave the Roe sack at some central spot in the woodland and stalk 'light' so just with rifle, sticks and bino/thermal, that is a delight, and as long as you're not more than a few hundred yards from your Roe sack you can always drag a carcass towards it (when going downhill) or collect your Roe sack and take it to a carcass (when having to go uphill). Either way, the one day you don't have a means to carry a carcass or to get your truck close to a pick-up point, you will regret it.
 

Klenchblaize

Well-Known Member
Make a drag line out of parachord and forget the sack.

The ideal roe sack would be one that had consealable shoulder straps so it could be slung over one shoulder until after the shot.

K
 

5pointer

Well-Known Member
Some more very helpful suggestions. I particularly like the idea of trying to make it more compact with the bungee cord, so I’ll deffo give that a go.

Thank you all for all of the advice.

5pointer.
 

Freeforester

Well-Known Member
The bungee or elastic cord/s around the body can be used to keep the rolled up liner on the inside in place, and double up as somewhere to store a jacket, especially once you've filled the sack with a deer and have a bit of a hike to get back to base. As for using stretchy thin chord to drag your beast through the ground debris, I'd suggest you remove about a third of the deer's weight and bulk by gralloching it at or near where fallen, and most able bodied folk can manage up to 30kg on their back in a well designed and made roe sack ( it should have a cross chest strap, which not only aids with distribution of loaded weight, but also helps with binocular storage/reduction of swinging/slapping when making your approach); if you wish to drag your (presumably valued) venison over the dirt, do please feel free to do so, but for me, and my customers, and not least the slain deer, I feel all deserve a little more care, and hygiene. Just my view. :tiphat:
 

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