Nic B

Member
Hi All,
More of a warning to readers thinking of buying a Sako than anything else.
I have really enjoyed shooting Tikka / Sako over the years and my go to stalking rifle is a Sako in 308. However, I purchased a 85 Hunter in 375H&H from its first owner (purchased 3 years ago from Avalon guns in Somerset). As those who have shot these know, they are no target rifles, with no Uk-legal quarry and with reasonable solid/ soft Ammo at £4-5 a pop, see very low shot counts by most owners outside of dangerous game trips offshore. The seller of this rifle mentioned a bucket-list hunt in Africa that never materialised so it was time to sell the rifle. It was in mint condition and after getting the right glass (low mag Swarovski) onto some optilock mounts to complement the iron sights,I took it out to Bisley to zero the rifle. After 5 rounds, fired from standing, the walnut stock started splitting! Naturally I stopped firing and returned the Rifle to GMK (the importers of Tikka/Sako /Beretta etc) for their immediate attention. The shop assistant (at a GMK -owned store) who took in my rifle, returned the action to the stock (I separated it for transportation) and when he screwed the action back in, the barrel no longer was free-floating... picture in the linked album below! I called the Finnish Sako factory and spoke to a gunsmith who explained that it may be the recoil block that was incorrectly bedded but they'd need to see it to confirm. Apparently this will take at least 6 months... While the rifle is a year outside of the 2 year warranty - this looks like far more of a manufacturing defect to me, certainly not the quality I expect from Sako! I'll keep you updated as to if GMK / Sako recognise this defect and rectify it at their cost.

Link here to a photos of the stock and cracks.
 

jb1

Well-Known Member
A bigger issue for me would be that fact that it would take 6 months to resolve the fault.

I returned a Browning Maral 9.3x62 to Rugby Gun and Tackle due to a very similar issue, the stock was replaced within a couple of weeks.
 

Nic B

Member
A bigger issue for me would be that fact that it would take 6 months to resolve the fault.

I returned a Browning Maral 9.3x62 to Rugby Gun and Tackle due to a very similar issue, the stock was replaced within a couple of weeks.
Fingers crossed they deal with it swiftly!
 

redlab

Well-Known Member
Hi All,
More of a warning to readers thinking of buying a Sako than anything else.
I have really enjoyed shooting Tikka / Sako over the years and my go to stalking rifle is a Sako in 308. However, I purchased a 85 Hunter in 375H&H from its first owner (purchased 3 years ago from Avalon guns in Somerset). As those who have shot these know, they are no target rifles, with no Uk-legal quarry and with reasonable solid/ soft Ammo at £4-5 a pop, see very low shot counts by most owners outside of dangerous game trips offshore. The seller of this rifle mentioned a bucket-list hunt in Africa that never materialised so it was time to sell the rifle. It was in mint condition and after getting the right glass (low mag Swarovski) onto some optilock mounts to complement the iron sights,I took it out to Bisley to zero the rifle. After 5 rounds, fired from standing, the walnut stock started splitting! Naturally I stopped firing and returned the Rifle to GMK (the importers of Tikka/Sako /Beretta etc) for their immediate attention. The shop assistant (at a GMK -owned store) who took in my rifle, returned the action to the stock (I separated it for transportation) and when he screwed the action back in, the barrel no longer was free-floating... picture in the linked album below! I called the Finnish Sako factory and spoke to a gunsmith who explained that it may be the recoil block that was incorrectly bedded but they'd need to see it to confirm. Apparently this will take at least 6 months... While the rifle is a year outside of the 2 year warranty - this looks like far more of a manufacturing defect to me, certainly not the quality I expect from Sako! I'll keep you updated as to if GMK / Sako recognise this defect and rectify it at their cost.

Link here to a photos of the stock and cracks.
While I appreciate the fact that you have a broken rifle, and want that sorted - If its a manufacturing defect, a couple of things. I would have to mention the fact its second hand - you have not owned from new and do not know the history - what happened in the other owners presence - did he drop it etc etc
also why have a go at gmk - the rifle is a year out of warranty and they are still willing to have a look at it for you? If you want warranty buy a new rifle - if you want a cheaper rifle or quicker than the importer can supply you - thems the chances you take in this life I'm afraid.....
 

AGR

Well-Known Member
Hi All,
More of a warning to readers thinking of buying a Sako than anything else.
I have really enjoyed shooting Tikka / Sako over the years and my go to stalking rifle is a Sako in 308. However, I purchased a 85 Hunter in 375H&H from its first owner (purchased 3 years ago from Avalon guns in Somerset). As those who have shot these know, they are no target rifles, with no Uk-legal quarry and with reasonable solid/ soft Ammo at £4-5 a pop, see very low shot counts by most owners outside of dangerous game trips offshore. The seller of this rifle mentioned a bucket-list hunt in Africa that never materialised so it was time to sell the rifle. It was in mint condition and after getting the right glass (low mag Swarovski) onto some optilock mounts to complement the iron sights,I took it out to Bisley to zero the rifle. After 5 rounds, fired from standing, the walnut stock started splitting! Naturally I stopped firing and returned the Rifle to GMK (the importers of Tikka/Sako /Beretta etc) for their immediate attention. The shop assistant (at a GMK -owned store) who took in my rifle, returned the action to the stock (I separated it for transportation) and when he screwed the action back in, the barrel no longer was free-floating... picture in the linked album below! I called the Finnish Sako factory and spoke to a gunsmith who explained that it may be the recoil block that was incorrectly bedded but they'd need to see it to confirm. Apparently this will take at least 6 months... While the rifle is a year outside of the 2 year warranty - this looks like far more of a manufacturing defect to me, certainly not the quality I expect from Sako! I'll keep you updated as to if GMK / Sako recognise this defect and rectify it at their cost.

Link here to a photos of the stock and cracks.
Did you not challenge the seller? It obviously wasn't fit for purpose and he may have a conscience.
 

Nic B

Member
While I appreciate the fact that you have a broken rifle, and want that sorted - If its a manufacturing defect, a couple of things. I would have to mention the fact its second hand - you have not owned from new and do not know the history - what happened in the other owners presence - did he drop it etc etc
also why have a go at gmk - the rifle is a year out of warranty and they are still willing to have a look at it for you? If you want warranty buy a new rifle - if you want a cheaper rifle or quicker than the importer can supply you - thems the chances you take in this life I'm afraid.....
Fair point, as you mention this had everything to do with the import wait for a new one. I paid very close to RRP! From the inspection I gave it when purchasing it, it looked absolutely mint to me but ai am taking him at his word, he was the first person I spoke to afterwards. As mentioned, I’ll be very happy to report if GMK offer to make this right but my bitter experience with a Beretta in the past doesn’t leave me hopeful.
 

Nic B

Member
Every single one of your posts has been a product complaint. I find that odd.

Nonetheless, I wish you well with getting your rifle fixed. It is very frustrating to be without.

Kind regards,

Carl
True - both matters I raise here were. As the first line indicates, this is more of a product warning that I wish I had when searchingg for this rifle. That said, I assume you took the time to read my last problem from a few years ago which was adequately sorted which speaks volumes for the help the retailer offered a customer - an example for the trade.
 

stubear

Well-Known Member
To be fair if you paid very close to RRP then you may have been better off just going for a new one outright and getting the warranty! JMHO and all that, but it seems like that little extra on the purchase price would have saved a lot of aggro now.

I've always found Sako and Beretta to be very well made bits of kit and their customer service has always been decent. I've seen decades old Sako rifles and Beretta shotguns that are still going strong and still look the part. Hopefully this is a one off problem and you can get it fixed.

I wish you luck getting your rifle sorted.
 

Nic B

Member
Did you not challenge the seller? It obviously wasn't fit for purpose and he may have a conscience.
Yep - first person I spike to.
To be fair if you paid very close to RRP then you may have been better off just going for a new one outright and getting the warranty! JMHO and all that, but it seems like that little extra on the purchase price would have saved a lot of aggro now.

I've always found Sako and Beretta to be very well made bits of kit and their customer service has always been decent. I've seen decades old Sako rifles and Beretta shotguns that are still going strong and still look the part. Hopefully this is a one off problem and you can get it fixed.

I wish you luck getting your rifle sorted.
Thanks - in hindsight a 6 month wait upfront would have been preferable! I felt the same about Sako (and a while ago, Beretta) hence seeking one out for this rifle. My 308 has never given trouble!
 

Nic B

Member
A bigger issue for me would be that fact that it would take 6 months to resolve the fault.

I returned a Browning Maral 9.3x62 to Rugby Gun and Tackle due to a very similar issue, the stock was replaced within a couple of weeks.
I’ll let you know - i’d be delighted to have to eat my words at swift and efficient handling of this matter!
 

375 mag

Well-Known Member
If it's out of warranty you'll be looking at buying a new stock. Very doubtful they will replace it free of charge.
 

jb1

Well-Known Member
It could be caused by a number of things, loose stock screws, loose recoil lug, recoli onto something that's a solid, previously damaged. Plus a few other things I've not thought of, but until it's looked at by a professional its a difficult one to be able to point the finger.
 

Heym SR20

Well-Known Member
Any rifle with recoil levels of a 375 h&h needs careful wood selection and proper bedding and then correct seating of the action and tension on the action screws. If the stock is removed it is not put back together properly - ie with the recoil lug hard against the wood / recoil pin it is just a matter of time before it splits.

From what I have read most factory DG rifles need attention and a lot of testing before being used in anger.

Since it is out of warranty I would take it to somebody who really knows and understands DG rifles to have it sorted properly. Given the stock is cracked, you may need a new stock, but equally application of epoxy, some pins and bedding compound may be a better solution. A new stock should be bedded any how.

The trouble with a lot of modern Walnut is that it is not the really dense solid stuff used on old rifles. If a vintage Rigby or Holland, they did nt stock with fancy walnut. Instead it was dense and straight grained, with the grain carefully laid out to take recoil. The action was carefully fitted by hand so it is a perfect fit into the wood. The cross pins are also perfectly fitted to take the recoil.

Modern factory rifles - blanks are laid out by accountants, and then milled by machine. Inletting is not perfect - ok for a 243, not a 375. That’s why there is a huge aftermarket industry / service in bedding rifles.

If you want a properly bedded rifle from new, you need to paying for the handwork to do it properly.
 

enfieldspares

Well-Known Member
My hunch is that at some time the barreled action has been taken out of the stock and then not put back correctly.

That this has caused the barreled action to have a gap between it and the woodwork.

Such that it can then recoil on its own, as it were, rather than as a single united "whole" of stock and action.

Although this distance the barreled action has recoiled (until it "hits" the stock is tiny) it is enough to crack the woodwork.
 
Last edited:

Ronin

Distinguished Member
Simple fix with new stock

Though I’m not sure where one stand with warranty unless they offer goodwill

Unlike other males there is only one recoil lug on this rifle for such a large calibre - the woodwork at the tang looks to have suffered because of that
 
Last edited:

Top