PSE Composites Limited

p44jod

Member
Hi there,
I’m looking to apply for my first shotgun license, I would appreciate any advice on what type of shotgun would be best suited for a beginner?

I will predominately use it for pest control/protection of crops on wood pigeons with the odd plinking now and then.

any recommendations on cheap shotguns that can shoot steel shot? Rough budget of £200 to spend but ideally cheaper as this will be a work horse shotgun/first shotgun.

I’ve been told that a SXS AYA yeoman while not steel proof, the barrels are thick enough to handle steel proof and as this gun won’t be sold on the pitting, if any, won’t matter and might be a good option but wanted to get more opinions as I’m super new to shotguns.

also anyone know of any reputable gunshops in the Cardiff/South Wales area that would have second hand/cheap shotguns available or should I aim to buy one from GT/GS or auction?
 

James0586

Well-Known Member
sportsman gun centre in Newport
keens in Bridgend ( Aberkenfig)
Merlins in Pontypridd

All the above have new and second hand shotguns where you can see them and handle them with advice from the staff.
 

p44jod

Member
sportsman gun centre in Newport
keens in Bridgend ( Aberkenfig)
Merlins in Pontypridd

All the above have new and second hand shotguns where you can see them and handle them with advice from the staff.
Thank you! Is there one you would recommend over the others or are they all equally great?
 

Sampo

Well-Known Member
Have you looked at Guntrader? Would go for a cheap semi automatic if I were you, as it weighs less, kicks less, can get 3 shots at a time and its fun. You should be able to find this within the budget. You should be able to find side by side also at that price.

I tend to go for synthetic because of its ease to maintain.
 

p44jod

Member
Have you looked at Guntrader? Would go for a cheap semi automatic if I were you, as it weighs less, kicks less, can get 3 shots at a time and its fun. You should be able to find this within the budget. You should be able to find side by side also at that price.

I tend to go for synthetic because of its ease to maintain.
I’ve had a look but there’s so many different brands etc that in all honesty I’m a bit lost on what to go for
 

p44jod

Member
Their all equally good I use them all. What is the gun going to be used for?
Pest control, farmer with a few acres of crops doesn’t mind me shooting on his land as long as I come down every now and then to help get rid of the woodies
 

enfieldspares

Well-Known Member
In truth the market is a buyer's market but you can end up being sold a heap of uselessness if you are not careful. Or worse a heap of uselessness at an inflated price.

Supposedly all modern shotguns with 70mm chambers will if choked appropriately fire standard steel. Only steel cartridges marked as "High Performance Steel" require the fleur-de-lys marking. Old "English" boxlock non ejectors with 65mm chambers are moribund and I'd not want to pay anything more than £50 for one and with that £50 expect it to be near immaculate in the bores. If pitted then pass it by. There's plenty of choice.

My most relevant advice is how tall are you? Get a good correct gunfitting form a competent gunfitter (no that isn't Ted's mate Fred who runs an otherwise good commercial clayground) and then when you know the length of pull you need you have already trimmed your list potential purchase options to a manageable length.

I hate to close on this comment but my advice (and I've actually in near fifty years of this game ever actually shot one by any maker) would be to look at an over and under of Beretta or Miroku or similar first rank volume O/U manufacturer as a long term choice and a cheap Lanber or similar "Italian job"as something just to play with until your budget is greater.

But one final point if you go to a clayground and have a round of "pay and play" and straight every bird that you shoot at with the ground's loan/newcomer shotgun then buy that very one or its identical twin! You've found all you'll ever need!
 

p44jod

Member
Anything that fits you properly.
I’ve been told with this is that it’s hard to fit a gun to someone who’s new as they don’t have a shooting posture/style, I don’t know if this is true though. Once I have the gun I’ll be taking lessons with it to make sure I can use it effectively
 

James0586

Well-Known Member
Pest control, farmer with a few acres of crops doesn’t mind me shooting on his land as long as I come down every now and then to help get rid of the woodies
You can get a cheap 3 shot semi automatic or a side to side or over and under,
I would go to a gun shop and have a look over what they have and see what suits you best.
 

enfieldspares

Well-Known Member
I’ve been told with this is that it’s hard to fit a gun to someone who’s new as they don’t have a shooting posture/style, I don’t know if this is true though. Once I have the gun I’ll be taking lessons with it to make sure I can use it effectively
Length is what initially is important. Get that right. Regardless of bad posture or style the correct length for you will be the same. All the rest...drop...cast....can be adjusted as you learn correct mounting. And whilst you can cut wood off the end it still costs nearly as much to do and finish off correctly as it does to add wood on. What height and what chest measurement are you?
 
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McKenzie

Well-Known Member
I've shot a lot of different side by sides & over & unders, including some very good ones & I shoot just as well with a £100 laurona O/U I picked up last year once I had the stock length adjusted to the 16" I need. It doesn't need to cost much if you're an average size & don't need lots of adjustments. If you ever want to shoot game I wouldn't entertain the idea of a semi-auto as you won't be welcome.
 

Sampo

Well-Known Member
I’ve had a look but there’s so many different brands etc that in all honesty I’m a bit lost on what to go for
Brands doesn't matter, they all pretty much shoot fairly similar for the purposes you have mentioned. As other have mentioned, go for the right fit and spend some time shooting and it will be fine. If possible fire the one you are planning to buy a few times and you will feel if its for you or not. Its like your first car, the more you get used to one, the more you will start building a list of preferences for your next one. On a SG license, you can buy as many SGs as you want, so just enjoy what you do.
 

p44jod

Member
Length is what initially is important. Get that right. Regardless of bad posture or style the correct length for you will be the same. All the rest...drop...cast....can be adjusted as you learn correct mounting. And whilst you can cut wood off the end it still costs nearly as much to do and finish off correctly as it does to add wood on. What height and what chest measurement are you?
6ft 38” chest
 

8x57

Distinguished Member
p44jod absolutely no disrespect intended but if you can take a friend along when you visit the gun shop, someone who knows something about shooting. From what you have said so far you sound far to green to go on your own and they will have your trousers down. Saying that if you only have £200 to play with you won't go too far wrong with something like a Baikal to start you off.
 

enfieldspares

Well-Known Member
6ft 38” chest
OK. That IMHO rules out ANY gun be it O/U or S/B/S with length of pull of under 14 1/2" and indeed I'd not look at anything that wasn't at least therefore 14 3/4". The length of pull being (assuming you are unfamiliar with how it is measured) the distance in a straight line from the centre of the rear of the butt to the front of the frontmost trigger if a double trigger or front of the only trigger if a single trigger) as below.

As here in BOTH red and blue:

LOP_12_20.jpg

Also ignore the incorrect advice at 1:36 or thereabouts in this video. And really the presenter ought to know better! He's correct about the finger and crook of the elbow method being nonsense. But....the three fingers from the front of the comb is silly advice. Many guns have longer or shorter comb endings according to the style or fashion of the time. So ignore what's said at 1:36.

 
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p44jod

Member
p44jod absolutely no disrespect intended but if you can take a friend along when you visit the gun shop, someone who knows something about shooting. From what you have said so far you sound far to green to go on your own and they will have your trousers down. Saying that if you only have £200 to play with you won't go too far wrong with something like a Baikal to start you off.
I completely agree! This happened when I purchased my first air rifle, ended up with a PCP fully works and the purpose I used it for a springer would have been fine! I’ll add baikal for the list of shotgun brands to look out for
 

p44jod

Member
OK. That IMHO rules out ANY gun be it O/U or S/B/S with length of pull of under 14 1/2" and indeed I'd not look at anything that wasn't at least therefore 14 3/4". The length of pull being (assuming you are unfamiliar with how it is measured) the distance in a straight line from the centre of the rear of the butt to the front of the frontmost trigger if a double trigger or front of the only trigger if a single trigger) as below.

As here in BOTH red and blue:

View attachment 201810
In
Thank you so much!! I’ll write this down and make sure I get a shotgun that meets the specs
 
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