How to lead a running boar.

A Guy Out West

Well-Known Member
Just wondering how you lead them. Say you are using a .308 150 gr., range is under 100 M, how much lead do you use? A foot in front? Right on the front of the animal? 6"? I realized the speed of the animal is a big factor, say the average running speed during a driven shoot, if there is such a thing. Thinking about doing it in the not too distant future.
Cheers
 

Scotty99

Well-Known Member
I was taught using the "Nuts to Neck" mantra. Basically start to swing through the beast on a line from nuts to neck I.e. Diagonally up the body. Pull the trigger when you are just behind the eye for most driven distance shots. Allow more lead if the beast is further out. Seems to work well.
 

sh1kar

Well-Known Member
on the running deer at Bisley 100 yards I aim 1 foot in front of brisket with .275 to drop into chest and its not motoring I would tend to agree with aim at snout for a boar
S
 

Scotty99

Well-Known Member
The best thing is to get on a running boar target range. There is one at Bisley I think, the one I used was at Corinium Rifle Range in Wiltshire. Everyone sees lead differently and the distance of the boar from the shooter and the speed it is running all play a part, so as with most things pratice is the key. But the comments on this thread will get you headed in the right direction.

Just realised you are in Oregon. So the ranges over here won't be of much use. Not sure if you have any locally, but I guess you could make one easily enough with some rails, wheels, cable and an electric motor. Any body out there got any plans of how to make one?
 
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Lateral

Well-Known Member
There are many variables, and realistically, trial, & error, and practise are the best ways to learn.

Boar are rarely running at 90 degrees to your position, so it's not just speed, but taking the angle into account, as they quarter to, or away from you, head on, or the Texas heart shot ! And there change of acceleration, is unbelievable !

It's really important to try, and stay on the target, the lower the power the scope/sight, the easier it is to do this, because you can often see where you're shooting, and can compensate with a second, or even third shot.


From experience, the average shot ratio from a reasonably capable group is circa 3:1, more experienced shots will average circa 2:1, & the Spanish/Portuguese using semi-auto Browning Bars, or shotguns circa 5-6:1 :D
 

Kalahari

Well-Known Member
Seriously, a safe backstop and an old car tyre with the middle closed buy a sheet of cardboard rolled down a slope will do it. Rough but ready.

David.
 

jb1

Well-Known Member
just dont over think it, ive been asked umpteen times how much lead to give, ive never been able to give a definite answer, just dont shoot behind the front legs into the abdomen. It can end up with dogs getting injured or even killed by Boar unable to run on. Ive seen umpteen Boar with very poor shot placement, rear end damage mostly from slow guns.
 

Lateral

Well-Known Member
just dont over think it, ive been asked umpteen times how much lead to give, ive never been able to give a definite answer, just dont shoot behind the front legs into the abdomen. It can end up with dogs getting injured or even killed by Boar unable to run on. Ive seen umpteen Boar with very poor shot placement, rear end damage mostly from slow guns.

Do you mean heavy bullet, slow calibres ? Or just people who swing their gun slowly ?
 

Lateral

Well-Known Member
Sounds like slow swinging guns
I read it the other way, slow, heavy bullets !

Clearly, if the gun is swung too slowly, or the shooter stops swinging as they take the shot, regardless of calibre, the shot will be too far back.

I normally use a 9.3x62, & 9.3x74, but for various reasons, used a 300wm on a trip a month ago. It took me a little time to adapt, because I was missing in front, although that may also have been to do with shooting a 27" barrel with brake, rather than my normal circa 20" barrel, and feeling like I really needed to push through ? But that was soon sorted, and I enjoyed using it.


I'd be really interested to know just what the difference in POI is, between a bullet travelling at circa 2500fps, and another at circa 3000fps, at say 30m, at say 20 kph ? Anyone out there good at maths :D
 

mereside

Well-Known Member
I really think going to the shooting cinema is the way forward to learn as you can pinpoint where your bullet was when you aimed and within a couple of shots have it sorted, all scenarios accounted for so you soon get to grips with it and know for certain what you did right or wrong, rolling a tyre down a hill or other methods, even an outdoor running range, if you miss the target you have no way of knowing what you did, regards wayne.
 

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