Immobilon

Nightwalker

Well-Known Member
A couple of years back I shot a very, very poor roe buck who had the mandatory 'Eat Not' post Imobilon tags in each of his ears. I don't know where he came from but who ever released him near my ground didn't do him any favours given the condition he was in. I used him for dog food and he never got near the human food chain
 

bobt

Well-Known Member
A couple of years back I shot a very, very poor roe buck who had the mandatory 'Eat Not' post Imobilon tags in each of his ears. I don't know where he came from but who ever released him near my ground didn't do him any favours given the condition he was in. I used him for dog food and he never got near the human food chain

I wouldnt have fed it to my dogs.
 

Nightwalker

Well-Known Member
I saw it several days running before I managed to shoot it and it was pretty lively but in poor condition. I couldn't see any risk to the dogs and as it happened I was right.
 

Buchan

Well-Known Member
Thanks for your honesty. As I said I do understand but on welfare grounds I feel a responsibility to look into it. I currently have a stag who has a lovelly pair of slippers on and there are two options. One is to shoot him and the other is to put him to sleep while I cut his toe nails. Not keen on one. Or is doing nothing an option?
HI,

Is the stag lame? If not then an option might be to leave alone. There is a lot of work in sheep now, showing that routine trimming is not beneficial.
Re Immobilon, as others have said this has been an interesting thread. I've always regarded the stuff as highly dangerous, but there is no doubt it has a place for rapid knock down
 

howa243

Well-Known Member
Have been talking to a deer farmer in Aus who uses Rompon on Reds. I didnt think we used Rompon on Reds over here, but it would seem a better choice as I believe it does have a withdrawal period. Can anyone put me straight on the subject please. Is this a dosage issue?
 

Paul at Fechan

Well-Known Member
so in Dexter the showtime hit series the main character uses M99 (the US name for immobilon) to knock out people before abducting them (they are all bad guys). I take it then that's just silly and it would kill them. Yes, I know but TV's important.... sorry
 

howa243

Well-Known Member
so in Dexter the showtime hit series the main character uses M99 (the US name for immobilon) to knock out people before abducting them (they are all bad guys). I take it then that's just silly and it would kill them. Yes, I know but TV's important.... sorry
Excellent series. Always watch it and its the last one on Friday :(. I was thinking exactly the same. You never see Dexter giving them anything to revive them. Pah.
 

Paul at Fechan

Well-Known Member
Yeh... I'm thinking some of the stuff in these TV shows must be made up :-| Ah damn it, what will I tell the kids when they grow up. There was my oldest looking at uni courses in blood splatter analysis :rolleyes:
 

Apache

Well-Known Member
Have been talking to a deer farmer in Aus who uses Rompon on Reds. I didnt think we used Rompon on Reds over here, but it would seem a better choice as I believe it does have a withdrawal period. Can anyone put me straight on the subject please. Is this a dosage issue?
No it's a money issue, no-one will pay for the required testing.

You could use it in people but the dose would be very very tiny
 

howa243

Well-Known Member
Yeh... I'm thinking some of the stuff in these TV shows must be made up :-| Ah damn it, what will I tell the kids when they grow up. There was my oldest looking at uni courses in blood splatter analysis :rolleyes:
Funny you should say that. My son is studying medicine and I think that is a direct result of watching scrubs, my daughter went through a phase of wanting to study forensic science (because she watched a lot of CSI) and I was reading in the newspaper that these programs do result in large intakes of folks into courses for which there are no jobs when they graduate. The power of TV, and as you say Paul some of it is made up.
 

Buchan

Well-Known Member
According to this http://wildpro.twycrosszoo.org/S/00Chem/ChComplex/xylazine.htm it has a withdrawal period of 14 days if used in cattle. Does the withdrawal period relate to the specis rather than the drug?
Oh dear. You’ve touched on a growing problem for us vets. Food safety demands and inevitable bureaucracy have made life a challenge for treating animals. Withdrawal periods apply to the drug and the animal as each animal will metabolise the drug in a slightly different way. (For example, cats lack the enzyme to breakdown paracetamol (Cytochrome P450 to be precise) thus it is highly toxic to them). As Apache says, the cost of determining the withdrawal period and the “maxiumum residue level” (MRL) is huge – in the millions. The total sale of xylazine (rompon) in the UK will be less than this, so there is no incentive to licence it. If a product isn’t licensed for a condition and a species, you can use alternatives under what is called the cascade system, but it gets complex. If there is no MRL, it can't be used in animals for human consumption. Even if it has a withdrawal in NZ, it doesn’t apply in the UK. Xylazine is licensed in the UK, but only for Zoo deer. As far as I am aware it would not be possible to use any anesthetics or sedative on a deer and it then allow it into the food chain.
You can see the logic, but it is at times potty. The best example is the local anaesthetic, lignocaine. No MRL due to cost, yet used daily by dentists. Potty. Right, off hobby horse

Re Dexter, Etorphine would probably kill his victims.
 

howa243

Well-Known Member
Oh dear. You’ve touched on a growing problem for us vets. Food safety demands and inevitable bureaucracy have made life a challenge for treating animals. Withdrawal periods apply to the drug and the animal as each animal will metabolise the drug in a slightly different way.
Sorry to be pedantic but are you saying that even though it has a withrawal time of 14 days in cattle (in th UK) this would not be relevant to its use in deer and therefore like immobilon it would have no effective withdrawal time for deer.
 

Buchan

Well-Known Member
Sorry to be pedantic but are you saying that even though it has a withrawal time of 14 days in cattle (in th UK) this would not be relevant to its use in deer and therefore like immobilon it would have no effective withdrawal time for deer.
'Fraid so. It's a bugger at times.
 

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