Shooting other people's homeloads...

New Avon Arms

xavierdoc

Well-Known Member
Some time ago I received some homeloads when I bought a secondhand gun. These were .45Colt gallery loads that "shot really well", according to the seller of the gun. He didn't want any money for them and so they were duly signed over. Since they were being shot through the same gun I thought they be good for plinking/practice etc.

Back home the ammunition was locked away and I shot the gun for years using my own homeloads.

Today I decided to free up some space in the cabinet so took the donated rounds to the range, along with some of my usual homeloads.

The donated loads were total gash. So much so I thought the sight was loose, or the gun damaged in some way. To my relief, when I used my own loads she shot as beautifully as ever:

CE122B51-6FCA-47F8-B608-F4A902965267.jpg


I inspected the remaining donated loads: primer-seating was uneven, variable OAL, some shaved bullets, one backwards primer...

...and this hidden gem. Can you spot it:
586FCC3A-BA3F-4F0A-A28D-5B257D2447BB.jpg


It's a 44mag case that's been through a 45Colt die set and has been stuffed with a .454 bullet instead of a .429 :
C453835F-FEFE-4061-8FF7-99E5BC4486D5.jpg



It doesn't show well in the pic (on the left) but the whole round is kinked!

38C8F73A-265B-4719-8520-CF26479F866C.jpg


Moral of the story- there's no such thing as a free lunch!
 

Muir

Well-Known Member
One of the Primary Rules of Handloading: YOU NEVER SHOOT ANYONE ELSE'S HANDLOADS.
You shot loads that looked like those?
I don't know which is more embarrassing: The quality of the loads or the fact that you shot them.
It was foolhardy, to say the least. ~Muir
 

xavierdoc

Well-Known Member
One of the Primary Rules of Handloading: YOU NEVER SHOOT ANYONE ELSE'S HANDLOADS.
You shot loads that looked like those?
I don't know which is more embarrassing: The quality of the loads or the fact that you shot them.
It was foolhardy, to say the least. ~Muir

The rounds I shot were the last 15 or so in a box and looked ok except for somewhat excessive lube. The spent cases looked ok and we're all the same headstamp (unlike the other box). The poor accuracy is what prompted closer inspection of the full, second box. All the empties in the first box had been through the same gun, so it seemed a shame to waste the remaining. Embarrassing, yes.

It does go to prove the adage you quoted.

Brave post.

Maybe someone else can learn from my mistake.
 
Last edited:

Yorkie

Well-Known Member
I could count on one hand the people I would trust to Handload for me and still have fingers to spare.

Yorkie.
 

EMcC

Well-Known Member
All I can say is that some of you must have some dodgy mates.
I used to reload for a few of my mates when reloading kit wasn't quite so available as it is now and had no problems or complaints at all.
Of course, just to satisfy the keyboard police, when I reloaded for others they were actually doing it for themselves using my kit and under my close supervision in my presence and no money changed hands.
 

Yorkie

Well-Known Member
All I can say is that some of you must have some dodgy mates.
I used to reload for a few of my mates when reloading kit wasn't quite so available as it is now and had no problems or complaints at all.
Of course, just to satisfy the keyboard police, when I reloaded for others they were actually doing it for themselves using my kit and under my close supervision in my presence and no money changed hands.

I agree. I have a few close shooting mates who I would trust implicitly to reload for me. Same as I trust them to not kill me when they are driving or give me botulism when cooking or shoot me in the head when stalking.

Yorkie.
 

Dawnraider

Well-Known Member
:eek::eek::eek::eek::eek::eek::eek::eek: that's all i can say,i have loaded some for my mate but it was for my old gun so all good tried and tested ammo,told him he's got to do it himself next time though.
 

JMS906

Well-Known Member
Case head seperation is not a result of poor handloading practices but that of a headspace probelm.

Ian.

No, it's inexcusable negilgence. The handloader should probe the inside surfaces of the cartridge at the web for signs of incipient head separation, and scrap all brass that shows the slightest sign. The RCBS Case Master provides a sharp probe for this purpose or you can make one from a paper clip. Most, if not all, handloading manuals show how to do this and, no doubt, a quick internet search would do the same.

-JMS
 
Top