Deer Indication Dog

jon15

Well-Known Member
Do any of you use dogs for indicating deer whilst stalking? I have been watching a few videos on YouTube about a chap from NZ who trains dogs for this and he calls them “Big Game Indicating Dogs” I was surprised to see he mainly used collie type dogs, he and has brought out a training program called the “blue print”. Has anyone used this? Do does anyone use a dog to indicate in a UK stalking environment? Would love to hear personal experiences if anyone does as am keen to try.
 

sauer

Well-Known Member
I use my lab .... not specifically trained etc , but she walk at heel all day quiet ..... helps to find odd occasion I do lose one in cover
But here’s the relevant bit to your question , when walking the rides , tracks etc I do usually walk and glass repeat..... but keep an eye on the dog .... she will let me know by her actions ..... if deer ahead and she winds them ... she steps couple steps in front and her head goes like buggery left right and scenting.... often enough I step down wee bit and voila! .... deer

She has the nose I don’t .... learned to watch her

Doesn’t directly answer your question I know to specifically trained dogs as per original post


Paul
 

Mossypaw

Well-Known Member
I use my lab .... not specifically trained etc , but she walk at heel all day quiet ..... helps to find odd occasion I do lose one in cover
But here’s the relevant bit to your question , when walking the rides , tracks etc I do usually walk and glass repeat..... but keep an eye on the dog .... she will let me know by her actions ..... if deer ahead and she winds them ... she steps couple steps in front and her head goes like buggery left right and scenting.... often enough I step down wee bit and voila! .... deer

She has the nose I don’t .... learned to watch her

Doesn’t directly answer your question I know to specifically trained dogs as per original post


Paul
I have a lab bitch exactly the same. She will indicate that there is a beast up ahead and I quite often have to stand behind her and use her ears and nose as a sighting line before I see it !
She spots reds on the hill and will look away at other things then come back to look at them, but roe seem to mesmerise her, she won’t take her eyes off them.
 

tattie

Well-Known Member
I too have a lab bitch.
She walks to heel when stalking (woodland mainly) and you can hear her scenting, then she moves forward a wee bit (just past heel) and depending on her reactions you get the jist of where she is indicating.
I wouldn't be without her, a fantastic asset when out.
 

Hanechdene

Well-Known Member
I have a Large Munsterlander which will point deer.

She walks slightly ahead of me, about 1/2 her body, so you can see her reactions.

But as she is now in her old age, when she points them and if she thinks you haven’t noticed she moves a little closer and then a little closer.

Just a pity she cannot instil the same pointing into the Cocker who also comes out.......
 

wildfowler1

Well-Known Member
Until recently I walk stalked with three Wirehaired Vizsla's now two they are my eyes and ears, as I am now getting old .They keep me in check and let me know where the deer are. We are a great team . They will track and always get me out of trouble. Wf1
 

cervusnippon2013

Well-Known Member
They use the collie cross type bloodlines as they are intelligent to take on board the instructions etc
Collies do have a certain level of prey drive but no where near the hpr breeds compared to drahthaar's as an example.
I've read that the visla's are not as hard going either and take a bit longer to train etc, their easier going dogs.
These types work better in the woodlands and broad leaf type forestry native to New Zealand. They don't want the dog to push ahead hard, just a yard or two and 'indicate' to the shooter who is behind the dog that there's a large game animal in front.
It's not difficult to train a dog to do this at all. Like any training it has to be consistent and not over bearing for the dog's ability. Obidience is key and not letting the dog run in on an animal after the shot is too.
 

Fosbery Holster

Well-Known Member
They use the collie cross type bloodlines as they are intelligent to take on board the instructions etc
Collies do have a certain level of prey drive but no where near the hpr breeds compared to drahthaar's as an example.
I've read that the visla's are not as hard going either and take a bit longer to train etc, their easier going dogs.
These types work better in the woodlands and broad leaf type forestry native to New Zealand. They don't want the dog to push ahead hard, just a yard or two and 'indicate' to the shooter who is behind the dog that there's a large game animal in front.
It's not difficult to train a dog to do this at all. Like any training it has to be consistent and not over bearing for the dog's ability. Obidience is key and not letting the dog run in on an animal after the shot is too.
My comparison of HPR’s for deer and game is drawn from personal experience, my present two, German Wirehaired Pointer and Hungarian Wirehaired Vizsla are different in many ways, both from working bloodlines.
My experience tells me the German nose is ever so slightly better than the Hungarian, but and this is a big but my German was a let’s put it nicely young hooligan in her younger days and l changed her name to ‘cloth ears’ oblivious to commands until she had finished doing what she was doing, but hey what a fabulous nose.
The Hungarian on the other hand (my second one) from day one totally biddable listens to every command ‘so easily’ trained and such a pleasure to work with, and just as hard going as the German, shooting over the Hungarian far earlier than the German. My choice between ‘my two’ the Hungarian.
 

North Stalker

Well-Known Member
I've got a Collie, took him out stalking with me from about 6 months. Never told him what to do, or how to do it. He soon got the idea, he will indicate deer (Air scenting) Red, Roe and Sika. He will 1/4 into shot deer using the air to locate, he will also ground track a wounded deer. He won't lock on to a deer, he does however enjoy "plucking" them once found, he will pull the hair.
He is not a chaser by nature, I have had him around chickens, cows, horses, sheep and he doesn't even bother to go and sniff them. He is only only interested in Deer, he won't chase one when we are out for a walk and one bolts, but as soon as the rifle goes pop, he is looking. He will also follow the lamps while out under license.

Plenty of people have seen him working and have said they would rather have him than some of the over expensive status dogs that some people have which don't know a deer from a chicken.
 

norma 308

Well-Known Member
I use my lab the last few yrs took to it like duck to water walks to heel indicates very well sits to the stick deployment and shot keen to find and gets stuck in if lively
I very rarely leave her at home if I do I feel lost without her and never leave her in the van
 

Heym SR20

Well-Known Member
I always stalk with my lab x bmh. She is on a lead as she is very keen and a bit unsteady but age is improving things.

She is very good at scenting and spotting deer, and on several occasions she has indicated deer in long grass, woodland etc that are not visible. I have learnt to watch her closely and pause and look hard - a tip of antler or ear gives it away.

She will sit a wait until things happen but there a real Look of disgust if i bump the deer or decide its not shootable.

And once the deer is down it only takes a moment or two to find it, even if it has run a good bit.
 

cervusnippon2013

Well-Known Member
Drahthaar (gwp) off imports. I was very lucky to come across this dog. The chap I bought her from had a few gwps off Irish breeding bloodlines previously and he has a drahthaar import himself and said there was no comparison. Due to the breeding and testing in Germany, the dogs are of a high standard.
 

Norfolk Horn

Well-Known Member
I have a hwv who is 8 this year, she likes to work a few yards ahead of me which is fine as I can see her body language. She is very bidible and walks to heal when required.
She was initially a bit gun shy and lays down when I set up my sticks. She still does this but now knows a bang means a deer. She will find deer and indicate there presence before I spot them especially in thick cover.
I always let her find the shot deer as this keeps her keen, and a bit of lung is gratefully excepted at gralloch time
I'm not surprised that a collie works well considering how mountain rescue use them.
I have always found shooting of any sort being wildflowing, rough shooting or stalking not to be half as fulfilling without a dog. I also fine it very reassuring that there is a very good chance I will recover what I shoot.
 

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