HMR, WMR or WSM - some real world advice please

kennyc

Well-Known Member
I live in wide open country and the 17HMR has it's appeal as a rim fire. Unfortunately, the ammo is unreliable and so my three HMR's gather dust in favor of my 22WMRs I have found that when you come on the ammunition a WMR likes, it will always like it. (provided you don't destroy the accuracy every outing by cleaning) It has plenty of energy and reach for 150 yard kills. That said, I favor small CF cartridges like the 22 Hornet. I reload so the cost is minimal, but the performance leaves the previously mentioned rimfires in the dust. A final note is that you have a 223. Use it. Learn to load for it. (Lee Classic loader: Everything you need an a shoebox) Carry on.
Never abandon the 22LR.~Muir
with judicious buying I can reload .223 cheaper than HMR or WMR at the moment, that said I use a 22LR with CCI segmented and it seems to do the job, and I am bringing my WMR out of retirement as I just picked up some Maxi Mags at a good price, so we will see how that works out.
 

Dexter

Well-Known Member
with judicious buying I can reload .223 cheaper than HMR or WMR at the moment, that said I use a 22LR with CCI segmented and it seems to do the job, and I am bringing my WMR out of retirement as I just picked up some Maxi Mags at a good price, so we will see how that works out.
But it's not cheaper if you take into account your time kenny.
 

Dexter

Well-Known Member
Lets not forget that the HMR is no more prone to wind than the 22LR. It's been tested and proven that at any given distance their deviation from POA is practically identical.
 

Cyres

Well-Known Member
Just ditch your .223 and forget anything above .22lr and use a .204. It will do everything you need is fantastically accurate quiet and easy to reload. Unless i am after close range rabbits in a place which is noise sensitive I use .204 all the time. If you are eating/selling rabbits then you will have to head shoot them so a good higher mag scope is a requirement. You could use lighter bullets for rabbits 32 grn will zip along at 4000 fps whilst 39/40's will do 3650 ish. Either bullet will dispatch foxs at ranges further than you can accurately shoot at.

D
 

kennyc

Well-Known Member
But it's not cheaper if you take into account your time kenny.
its a lot cheaper than buying expanding .223 by the boxfull and the same load does rabbits as well as it does foxs and even target use,as to time? thats not charged out as I reload as a hobby not a business.
to put it in context it costs me currently in the region of 24p a round 30grn CCI in WMR are around 32p a pop.
 

mealiejimmy

Well-Known Member
IMHO, 22 hornet is the cheapest round to reload for.
Assuming the case can be used 10 times, at current prices it works out as follows:
Case (PPU) - £24/100 = 2.4 p per pop
Primer (Rem 6 1/2) - £5/100 = 5p per pop
Powder (13gn Lilgun) - £45/lb = 8p per pop
Bullet (H&N 224 RN 45gn) - £68/1000 = 6.8 per pop
Total cost per round = 22.2p per pop
That works out at £11.10 for 50 rounds

17HMR in my neck of the woods is about £16-£17 per 50, 22WMR is around the same

Cheers

Bruce
 

Muir

Well-Known Member
Well I’ve just been watching videos about the Lee Classic loader and I’m seriously considering having a go. I thought reloading was far more technical than a hammer! Flippancy aside, I’m genuinely intrigued. I’ve got 32 spent Hornady 223 cases and the kit is £32 from sportsman gun centre. So powder and bullet heads from my rfd and I’m good to go. I reckon my next post will be in the reloading section!
People make it more difficult than it is. I used a Lee Classic in 223 for a lot of years and never lacked.~Muir
 

JackD032

Well-Known Member
People make it more difficult than it is. I used a Lee Classic in 223 for a lot of years and never lacked.~Muir
Muir, do you know if the provided powder measurements card covers Vihtavuori N100 Series powder?
 

philip

Well-Known Member
22 or 17 hornet - both are a delight to use and have a decent knockdown and range

WMR fantastic round and accurate out to a 100 yds

Overall I shoot my 22 hornet out to a 100 ish and it’s shoots 1/2 inch groups all day as does the WMR on an 1 inch group
The 17 hornet still working on
 

Sharpie

Well-Known Member
Muir, do you know if the provided powder measurements card covers Vihtavuori N100 Series powder?
You can figure it out yourself.

Lee publish VMDs for their dippers at https://leeprecision.com/cgi-data/instruct/VMD.pdf including the Viht. powders.

Viht. publish loads at Rifle reloading - Vihtavuori

Multiply load by VMD and you get the .cc of the dipper. Choose the one that fits between start and max. load. Or start with the next one down.

Or if you buy the Lee manual it's load data includes volumetric as well as weight info. for the powders.

If you can't find VMD data for your powder, you can calculate it yourself by taking a scoop full and weighing it.

BTW, dipping powder works very well. If you buy a (cheap) set of all the scoops you get a slide-rule thing that does this for you.

Actually, if you buy a Lee die set that comes with one scoop that nobody uses, that scoop-full of most suitable powders will be a good safe start.
 
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JackD032

Well-Known Member
You can figure it out yourself.

Lee publish VMDs for their dippers at https://leeprecision.com/cgi-data/instruct/VMD.pdf including the Viht. powders.

Viht. publish loads at Rifle reloading - Vihtavuori

Multiply load by VMD and you get the .cc of the dipper. Choose the one that fits between start and max. load. Or start with the next one down.

Or if you buy the Lee manual it's load data includes volumetric as well as weight info. for the powders.

If you can't find VMD data for your powder, you can calculate it yourself by taking a scoop full and weighing it.

BTW, dipping powder works very well. If you buy a (cheap) set of all the scoops you get a slide-rule thing that does this for you.

Actually, if you buy a Lee die set that comes with one scoop that nobody uses, that scoop-full of most suitable powders will be a good safe start.
Thanks mate, I’ve got some reading to do before I decide whether to give reloading a go.
 

Muir

Well-Known Member
Thanks mate, I’ve got some reading to do before I decide whether to give reloading a go.
The thing is, if you pick a load from the Vhit chart, using the volume of the dipper they supply, you will have a good load. Keep it simple and enjoy yourself. A million US reloaders got into reloading by purchasing the Lee Classic (then called "Lee Loader" ) and following the instructions on the card. Nothing else. No head scratching. They just followed the instructions. In this case, the one added step is to go to the Vhit site and compare the loads listed with the available volume you get from your dipper. (I can only guess but it will most likely be in the neighborhood of 23 grains of whatever. Most 223 loads are) You can scrutinize the process til the cows come home but just doing it is best. If you can follow instructions, you will do fine.~Muir
 

alberta boy

Well-Known Member
The thing is, if you pick a load from the Vhit chart, using the volume of the dipper they supply, you will have a good load. Keep it simple and enjoy yourself. A million US reloaders got into reloading by purchasing the Lee Classic (then called "Lee Loader" ) and following the instructions on the card. Nothing else. No head scratching. They just followed the instructions. In this case, the one added step is to go to the Vhit site and compare the loads listed with the available volume you get from your dipper. (I can only guess but it will most likely be in the neighborhood of 23 grains of whatever. Most 223 loads are) You can scrutinize the process til the cows come home but just doing it is best. If you can follow instructions, you will do fine.~Muir
My first reloading tool was a " Lee Loader " in , predictably , 303 British . It worked perfectly , 45 years later , it still does .

AB
 

alberta boy

Well-Known Member
In regards to the OP , I've owned all three . I currently own a WMR . There's nothing wrong with any of them , my problem was ammo availability . The ammo my 17's liked was very hard to come by up here , we are at the end of a very long supply line . The WMR I have now , a Savage 93 FV , is one of those rare gems . It shoots everything well , and a few selected types very well . It's a very capable round within limits . I have taken a few Coyotes with mine , it worked well , but there are better choices . If you do decide to start reloading , and you should , you can tailor your 223 reloads to very specific needs , a very practical solution . If you do decide on a rimfire , out of the three , I've found the WMR to be a bit more " general purpose " . It's a great Fox , Badger ( insert gasps here ) and general vermin rifle and 50 rounds of ammo doesn't weigh much , an important consideration when walking up to 10 K a day out on the short grass , your mileage may vary lol .

AB
 

25 Sharps

Well-Known Member
To the Op

I owned Wmr, bought into the hmr hype sold the wmr and bought one. Nice round but ammo issues had it moved on after a year. Now have a semi auto wmr for lamping off the truck and a bolt action for the land where I’m restricted to rim fires at the landowner’s wishes so I can’t use the hornet....

Modern wmr loadings (think 30 he vmax) are reliable and accurate. <inch at 80 out of the semi and at 100 out of the bolt gun. Point and shoot to 110 yards 1” holdover to 130.......

Ignore the naysayers on this calibre
 

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