Dialled in shooting

PSE Composites Limited

Danny Fireblade

Well-Known Member
I have a Z8i and Swaro do a free app which is really very good. You have choices of factory loads or manually inputting the data for hand loads.
I used the factory data and it gives clicks, cm/in or moa. Have taken deer to over 300 once deer ranged then adjusted clicks and aim straight in. Well worth it and very satisfying.
 

sh1kar

Well-Known Member
I have a Z8i and Swaro do a free app which is really very good. You have choices of factory loads or manually inputting the data for hand loads.
I used the factory data and it gives clicks, cm/in or moa. Have taken deer to over 300 once deer ranged then adjusted clicks and aim straight in. Well worth it and very satisfying.
Ditto for Zeiss V8
 

Overlay

Well-Known Member
The 'easiest' or most accurate way of getting your vertical adjustments at 100m 200m 300m etc is to go shoot those distances and make a note of the clicks (corrections) you had to dial on your scope to hit your target

This is commonly known as ''dope'' which stands for Data observed from previous engagements' or something equally roughty toughty

If you can't find a range to actually shoot those distances then you will have to rely on ''Data''

'Data' is information gained from applying ballistics curves and/or ballistic solvers like Strelok or Strelok Pro or Applied Ballistics etc etc

Often referred to as SWAG (Scientific Wild Arsed Guess), the information you get from your ballistic solver is only as good as the information that you feed it

Crap in = crap out

at the very least you must provide the app with

Muzzle Velocity
Drag coefficient
Height of 'centre of scope' above 'centre of bore'
Scope click value (hence all the comments above about whether your scope measures in Mils or MOA and by how much does one click adjust POI at a given distance) (if you go the dope route you don't care about all that coz you have got your click adjustments empirically)
Zero range

If you want to get a bit frisky you can add

direction of twist
twist rate
(the App will ask what calibre, bullet type what weight you are using so that it can look up your drag coefficient for you)

If you want to disappear into the world of the OCD

Then add atmospheric info like

Ambient temp
Humidity
Altitude
Latitude
Direction of shot
Wind direction and speed

Clearly you can't guess these variables yourself so you would need another gadget (yipee) - like the Kestral 5700 which measures all this stuff for you

Really clever ballistic apps like applied ballistics (which you will find in the kestral) will take all of the above and give you a solution based upon 'distance to target' and 'direction of shot' (yup now you need a range meter) and provide you with a solution

That gives you your click adjustments for range

Now the wind !!!

Judgements for wind is a black art that I've yet to get even close to getting right

Applied ballistics, together with the Kestral 5700 will give you an approx answer to this conundrum too

It is often wrong though as the calculation is based upon wind speed and direction at the kestral - usually at the shooters position - it has no idea what the wind is doing down range

Fortunately for shortish ranges of 100m to 400m the wind at the shooters position is usually adequate

Consfused?

I am !
Excellent. I must only be a partial dope, can’t wait to inform SWMBO. :rofl: :rofl: :rofl: :rofl:
she has another opinion like complete. ????
 

Overlay

Well-Known Member
Why not, it works?
Computers fly land planes, I’m sure they can carry out a simple mathematical calculation
Use whatever method suits, I quite enjoyed setting it up manually, took a while but it give me time to get used to the scope, I did read the instructions for once in my life, now after a bit of use I’ve got it and its a pleasure to use probably because I set it up myself and took the time with it, pretty awesome bit of kit, I’m pretty happy with or without it, but it’s nice to be able to have the facility 100%
 

MarinePMI

Well-Known Member
Just to add to the already long list of things...

Pick a method (MRAD/Mils or MOA/SMOA/TMOA). I'd recommend MRAD/Mils, simply because it is a base 10 method and easier to calculate in your head on the fly.

Second, either method is naught, if you're not using a front focal plane scope, or know at what power setting the reticle is calibrated for in a second focal plane scope.

Quit thinking in inches or mm's. The systems are angular, and match your reticle. WHat ever reticle you have, is the method you'll be using.

Years ago I would have to say this, but only mention it now since it's a rarity; make sure your dials match your reticle. In the past there were many scopes that had MOA dials, with Mil reticles. That is bad.

If you go MOA, make sure you understand WHAT type of MOA it is. Most now are TMOA (True MOA) IIRC, but some european scopes came in SMOA (Shooter's MOA, which was a rounded out version of the angular measurement), and will not calibrate correctly if your app is in TMOA.

Calibrate/true your app AT DISTANCE. Like twice what you intend to shoot (at least).

If you think of a ballistic arc as a curve, truing is simply putting known DOPE into your ballistic app, so it can "tack" the curve to the known DOPE at both ends of the curve. Thus, everything in between those "tacks" will be more accurate, and everything after it will extrapolate closer to a know "tack". Which means it will still degrade in accuracy past that point, but it will be better than degrading against a single point (your 100yd zero) that is even further away from your POA/POI (Point of Aim/Point of Impact). Essentially, without truing, you only have one "tack" in your curve. More tacks, equals better (truer) data. See the image below...

Truing.jpg
 

Donkey Basher

Well-Known Member
I am trying to get my head around dialling in for shooting. Ie scope is zeroed at 100 yards, so how many clicks for 300?
anybody put me to a “dialling in for idiots” site?
I known it is different for calibers but want to read up on the basics before going to the range.
probably be using my 243 if anyone is interested, mainly because it has a bipod.
Simple rule of thumb that'll get you on the paper is zero at 100 yards, add 2 MOA to get to 200 yards, add another 3 MOA to get to 300 yards. You won't be spot on but you will be close enough to make the necessary adjustments to find your specific adjustments for your set up 👍
 

Tazz

Well-Known Member
To help you get in to it go in to the Swarovski Ballistic program, it lets you put in calibre, bullet manufacturer, actual bullet including weight and then let’s you pick the zero range normally 100yds/mtrs then shows you the compensation in both clicks and inches/mm. As per earlier post these ballistic calculators are good but it’s then best to actually shoot at those distances to check the data
 
Top